Learn More

Explore these sources to learn more about members of the Ethan Allen household and their community:

  • Allen, Ethan. A Narrative of Colonel Ethan Allen’s Captivity 
    • Ethan Allen wrote this passionate narrative of his capture by the British near Montreal in 1775, sharing observations from his captivity. Written in 1779 in the middle of the American Revolution, the account spurred on patriot readers at a time when spirit for the war lagged.
  • Allen, The Allen Memorial (Palmer, MA: 1907) p.44-49 https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/005723605
  • Barr, Genealogy of Ethan Allen (Burlington, 1991)
    • This work is a compiled family tree of Ethan Allen, his ancestors, and descendants, complete with genealogical information and vignettes of family members.
  • Bellesiles, Michael A. Revolutionary Outlaws: Ethan Allen and the Struggle for Independence on the Early American Frontier. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1993.
    • This work is both a biography of Ethan Allen and a revisionist history of the eighteenth-century frontier. In it, Allen is the leader of a conflict between frontier subsistence farmers and New York elites and land speculators, which was important to them as independence from Great Britain.
  • Brown, Charles Walter. Ethan Allen of Green Mountain Fame. A Hero of the Revolution. Chicago: M.A. Donohue & Co., 1902.
    • This patriotic biography of Ethan Allen heroizes him as one of the United States’ founders.
  • Coldham, Peter Wilson. American Migrations, 1765-1799. The Lives, Times, and Families of Colonial Americans Who Remained Loyal to the British Crown Before, During, and After the Revolutionary War, as Related in their Own Words and Through Their Correspondence. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2000.
    • This work is a compilation of information about known loyalists and claims they made for compensation as a result of the American revolution, grouped alphabetically by region. The text’s introduction describes British North America after 1763, describes loyalist claims, and what life was like for those loyalists who stayed in America or emigrated following the war’s end. Much of the documentation in this work comes from loyalist claims with the American Claims Commission. An appendix points to archives where more information on some of these loyalists can be found.
  • Duffy, John J., and Eugene A. Coyle. “Crean Brush vs. Ethan Allen: A Winner’s Tale.”
    • This article tells the story of the animosity between Ethan Allen and Crean Brush, and breaks down several myths about their rivalry that hagiographies of Allen have constructed to portray Crean as a villain.
  • Duffy, John J., Samuel B. Hand, and Ralph H. Orth. The Vermont Encyclopedia. UPNE, 2003.
  • Duffy, John J., and H. Nicholas Muller III. Inventing Ethan Allen. University Press of New England, 2014.
    • This work deconstructs the traditional stories told about Ethan Allen’s life and his family, offering alternative readings based in historical scholarship to the tales Allen’s followers have conveyed over the years.
  • Duffy, John J., Ralph H. Orth, Kevin Graffagnino, Michael A. Bellesiles. Ethan Allen and His Kin: Correspondence, 1772-1819. A Selected Edition in Two Volumes. Hanover and London: University Press of New England, 1998.
    • This two volume anthology of the correspondence of Ethan Allen and his relations contains contextual footnotes that highlight the nuances of their exchanges and the circumstances that shaped their lives.
  • “Fanny Allen, Daughter of Ethan Allen, Becomes New England’s First Catholic Nun.” New England Historical Society, September 10, 2015. http://www.newenglandhistoricalsociety.com/fanny-allen-daughter-of-ethan-allen-becomes-new-englands-first-catholic-nun/.
    • Historians know more about the life of Fanny Allen, daughter of Ethan and Frances, than they do about her mother and namesake. This New England Historical Society article tells of her shocking conversion to Catholicism and her decision to become a religious sister in Montreal.
  • “Frances Montresor Buchanan Allen.” Accessed January 31, 2017. http://www.womenhistoryblog.com/2009/05/frances-montresor-buchanan-allen.html.
    • This blog post offers an overview not only of the little information known about Frances Montresor Buchanan Allen, but also biographies of the key men in her life, namely Crean Brush, Ethan Allen, and Jabez Penniman.
  • “Frances ‘Fanny’ Montresor Penniman (1760 – 1834) – Find A Grave Memorial.” https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=19910256.
    • This site marks the location of Frances Montresor Buchanan Allen’s grave. The page notes the location of the grave and includes images of the grave marker and a young Fanny. A short biography and some genealogical information about Fanny offer a brief record of her life and relations.
  • “How Ethan Allen Got Married to a Loyalist.” New England Historical Society, March 6, 2016. http://www.newenglandhistoricalsociety.com/how-ethan-allen-got-married-to-a-loyalist/.
    • The New England Historical Society published this article about the unusual tale of Ethan and Fanny’s courtship and marriage, based on an account from a man who claims to have witnessed the event, but would have been less than two years old at the time.
  • Jellison, Charles A. Ethan Allen: Frontier Rebel. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 1969, 314-315.
    • A biography of the controversial and mythical Green Mountain Boys leader, Ethan Allen. The work examines his philosophy on religion, his military career, his capture by the British during an unsuccessful attack in Montreal, and his role in the foundation of the State of Vermont.
  • Johnson, Tim. “Vermont’s 1777 Slavery Ban Had a Complicated Reality.” USA TODAY. http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/04/02/vermont-slavery-ban/7200493/.
    • While many historians have assumed that Vermont immediately abolished slavery in 1777, Vermont’s abolition of slavery was not so clear-cut. Slave holding and smuggling continued as Vermonters contested the process of emanipation. This article states that it remains uncertain whether the black laborers in the Allen household were enslaved or free.
  • Jones, Vermont in the Making, 1750-1777 (1939)
  • Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association (Deerfield. History and Proceedings of the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association. The Association, 1905.
  • “People of Westminster – Fanny Buchanan.” Accessed January 31, 2017. http://www.usgennet.org/usa/vt/town/westminster/fanny.html.
    • On this page the town of Westminster, Vermont, has compiled some brief biographical information about Frances Montresor Buchanan Allen derived from local resources.
  • Raphael, Founders: The People Who Brought You the American Revolution (2009)
  • Randall, Willard Sterne. Ethan Allen: His Life and Times. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2011.
    • This biography of Ethan Allen is a well-researched and much-needed update to previous, out-of-date Ethan Allen biographies. Like it’s predecessors, it is a story of upward mobility that portrays Allen as a frontier adventurer and war hero whose endeavors shaped the new nation.
  • “The Ethan Allen Homestead Museum | Home.” Accessed January 31, 2017. http://www.ethanallenhomestead.org/ethan-allens-burlington-home-1787-1789.html.
    • The home Ethan and Fanny Allen lived in still stands in Burlington, Vermont! Visit this page to learn more about the site, the Allen family, and how to visit.